Category Archives: Tech

Instagram folks…what are you waiting for?

Hey library land!  I get that you love Pinterest, I really do.  It’s a cool site.  But check out Instagram!  The statistics for Instagram are pretty impressive – it is growing exponentially and I believe it may have already surpassed FourSquare in membership!  (If not, it will soon.)

I recently hosted a webinar for work with over 100 participants – when I took a poll of social media usage, not one said their library was using Instagram.

What’s impressive is that it’s only available on iPhone right now and it’s reached surpassed FourSquare. It’s in beta for Android now, so I can only imagine what participation will be like when that rolls out.

Mobile social networks are where the world is headed and Instagram is quickly becoming the new leader.

 

Library Loyalty Programs – Worth Trying?

I was recently reading about Belly – an online service that helps small and medium sized businesses build customer loyalty programs.  There is a great article on Read, Write, Web about the services offered by Belly.

Are loyalty programs worth considering for libraries?  If so, what would the rewards be for library loyalty?  It may sound slightly far-fetched, but it’s something that we may need to consider.  What do you think?

Little bits of interesting…

Here’s a quick summary of some neat things from the web – all with potential library applications!

Tweet Seats – Theaters are reserving seats towards the back of venues and encourage those sitting in those seats to live tweet during performances.  Totally worth trying at your next large event!  Check out the article!

Google+ Hangouts – A great opportunity to host community meetings or book clubs.  This article provides the top three reasons to use this Google+ feature.

PressBooks – PressBooks is a platform that gives you or your library users an easy-to-use digital publication solution.  When we talk about empowering content creation in our libraries, these are the tools we need to look at!

Turn young patrons in to coders – Thomas Suarez is a 12-year-old coder who spoke at TEDxManhattanBeach.  He touches on an interesting and cool idea for schools that applies for libraries too – download the Apple app development pack and start teaching kids to code!

Paper.li is Love.ly

I was testing out Paper.li in an experiment for work. I wanted to see what it did and how it worked.  Subject experts, take note.  By typing in some key words or selecting particular folks in the social media world (twitter, Facebook and RSS feeds) you can put information on a number of topics in to your own digital newspaper.  From there, you can curate as needed, send it on to students or post it to your webpage.

You’ve probably gotten a newsletter/news round-up via some organization (I’ve gotten two so far) but try it for yourself.  It’s easy to set up and it’s free.

Here’s my quick test of it with key words “libraries” and “librarians”.  http://paper.li/f-1316119848

Lift, Is Facebook Killing Reading?, and Library 2025

Just three interesting notes from the web:

An article about Lift, the newest project from the creators of Twitter – read the article on Read, Write, Web.

And from England – a study that kids are getting more exposure to the written word from the pages of Facebook rather than the pages of books.  I have to say that as an adult a good chunk of the time I may have previously spent reading books is now spent consuming web-based media.  Is this the end of reading or an inevitable cultural shift? Well, you read the article and be the judge.

Last up – chapters being accepted now for a book entitled Library 2025.  Find out more on Facebook.  (Gah!  It’s killing the time you could be spending reading!)

Jawaya – Beta

I just received an email letting me know I can access the beta of Jawaya.  Jawaya is a search engine search tool that allows you to “record” your searches, then tag the results that are most useful.  That description doesn’t do it justice however.

Here’s how founder Charlie Crystle describes it:

Jawaya is a social Search Network that helps you

  1. save your searches and results,
  2. find searches and results found and shared by others
  3. search and discover with others
  4. and connect you with people who share your interests
I’m just getting started in this and trying to assess how it works and what it’s potential is.  I think it could have some really great applications in libraries and in education.  There are tools that are kind of like it out there, but…not.  And the beta is so new to me still, I can’t say “Well, it’s like Delicious meets Facebook meets your favorite search engine meets your ILS or favorite database. ”  Plus, the beta is still a tad rough (that’s what betas are for, after all) so there are features that are not fully implemented yet.
I’ll be taking a look at it more and playing around as it progresses and will keep you posted.  Stay tuned kids!
And PS – YOU can sign up and participate in the Beta too!  The more, the merrier!

Open Data and the Role of Librarians

In the June issue of Wired Magazine there was a brief piece about governmental open data initiatives.  In it, writer Jesse Lichtenstein brings up the crucial point that getting lots of data out on the web and available to the masses is great and all, but the people who might be most empowered by the trends and information that could be gleaned are the those least likely to have the skills, resources or knowledge to extract what might help them fight for their cause.

And isn’t this where libraries come in?  Isn’t this the type of role we should be taking on?  I’m certain that there are some libraries doing this – providing Internet access to help communities get this data, then teaching them how to sort, slice, dice and come to conclusions based on what they find and discover. Libraries can be the liason and interpreters of this data – or teach the “language” of data/data analysis to library patrons.

There are some other arguments surrounding the article – but I’m trying to focus on the one aspect I see as being most significant to our profession – helping communities harness open data is a role libraries should consider more heavily when they are looking at ways they can stay relevant.

If your library is doing this, please tell me about it, I’d like to learn more!

So, what do you think?

What do you think of Facebook Questions?

https://www.facebook.com/questions/

Any ideas on whether or not you’ll use it at your library?

I don’t have an opinion on it yet…but c’mon guys…I think we can leverage it somehow.  Or…maybe you want to avoid it all costs?

 

Patron Privacy and the Library Copy Machine

A friend sent me this video recently: http://www.wimp.com/copymachines/

It’s a CBS report about how information is stored on copy machines and how that information can be accessed when the wrong people get a hold of your copy machine.

They found medical records, police reports, and more on the copiers they examined.

If patron privacy is a concern for you, then you need to look into ensuring your copy machine hard drive is wiped clean or that your library purchases the document deletion technologies that are available.

You’re killing me with Twitter

I love Twitter.  I really do.  I use it constantly and am almost always connected to it.  But it drives me crazy sometimes.  So here are my tips for using Twitter effectively at work and in your personal life.  Most of this is wisdom that’s already out there.  Don’t get pissy if you don’t like the rules – they are mere observations and suggestions – take them as you will. Don’t hate the playa, hate the game.  (Oh, yes, I did just say that…)

Add people as friends so you can DM
If you manage your library’s Twitter account, make sure you friend your Tweeple when they friend you.  When you’re both all good and friendly, then they can Direct Message you.  And that means they can ask you questions without the whole world listening in.  And that works for us – we’re librarians, people need to ask us things. 

I just saw a great series of tweets in which a person tweeted a particular company saying “Will you please friend me so that I can DM you?  I’ve got a question.”  Really fantastic of them to ask!  And even better that the company did it!

If you can’t abbreviate well, don’t  do it all
Okay, maybe I’m old.  I haven’t taken the Pew Millennial Quiz yet, so maybe it’s a generational thing and I dont’ get it.  But there’s such a thing as too much abbreviation.  What more can I say?  If you need to abbreviate to the point of omitting all vowels and multi-syllables, then maybe your message needs a different outlet.

If you tweet more than three times a day, it better be awesome
Here’s the thing.  I follow a particular library that tweets, oh, 12 times a day?  The thing about that is that I don’t allow the tweets from that organization to make my phone go “ding”.  (That sounded dirty, eh?) I have a lot of tweets that do make my phone go ding – people who don’t tweet often but tweet with relevance.  Plus, I don’t need my phone dinging all the time (oh, this is just getting worse and worse…get your minds out of the gutter!)  So, basically, if you tweet to much, you’re annoying and you will be banned from the list of relevant tweeple that I want making my phone go “ding”.

If you can’t fit it in two tweets, then twitter isn’t your forum
I think that’s concise enough isn’t it?  Dude, you get 140 characters.  If you need more than that, you have a ton of other options.  You can always blog and then send the link via Twitter.  A good time to use two tweets?  Comedic timing.  Granted, I’m not that funny, but y’know – tweet one is the set up…a few seconds later, the punch line in tweet two.  @thepioneerwoman is really good at that.

Don’t just output – retweet, comment, respond
People say this again and again.  Why don’t others listen?  You are boring boring boring if you’re only talking about you.  Twitter is a conversation.  And you are a library professional.  Twitter provides great information – we have to move that info like a drug dealer!  Pass it on!  Share it!  Comment on it!  A great retweet from @tac_niso says it best: “RT @learnpublishing Twitter is like a dinner party – If all you talk about is yourself no one will want to talk to you @electriclit #toccon”

I’m such a freaking hypocrite!
I tell you not to share so much, then I tell you to share share share everything.  Here’s the thing.  We’re all smarty pants people here – you’re going to get a lot of word puke, but if you’re good at determining what’s actually not smelly grossness and is real content, then you’re doing good!  Kind of like when you get a reference question and you sort out the best materials for a patron and don’t just walk them to an entire section of the library.

Be mindful of what you tweet from conferences and meetings – we need some context.
You’re at a conference?  Listening to a great speaker?  That’s wonderful!  Oh they’re funny and saying brilliant things?  GREAT!  Here’s the thing…1) if you tweet too much, you’re breaking the three times a day rule and 2) often, the tweets are out of context for the rest of us.  To be fair, there are some people who tweet meetings and conferences very well, and to you, I say thank you.  It allows those of us not in attendance to learn. 

Use more than one platform to track your account –  Twitter, Hootsuite, Ubertwitter, Echofon…  I use both the regular Twitter page and Hootsuite to track my Twitter account.  Like anything else, different tools provide different perspectives and options – you can get a fresh look at what’s going on and maybe see things you’ve missed.  I love being able to search for key words using Hootsuite. 

Set up searches for you and your organization – Make sure you’re setting up searches for you and your organization name.  Hootsuite will display the search results (as will other similar sites) and you can track conversations occurring about you and your org.

After 24 hours it might not be worth responding  I have mixed feelings about this.  If someone tweets your library a question then you should respond even if you got it overnight.  But in terms of negative publicity, sometimes it might be best to let it just blow over.  If a grumpy 20-something tweets “The library stinks” and you don’t see it for 24 hours, you might just want to let it pass.  It’s not worth stirring the pot, so to speak.  However, if you feel you caught it as it happened or it is truly blasphemous, then you may want to direct message the person or politely respond publicly.

See how the Air Force assesses with social media issues here.

When you rant, rant with care.
It’s my job at work to approach those who tweet about my company.  If they rant, I quickly follow up.  It’s shocking how many people are surprised that we follow up on tweets – HELLLLLLO, it’s a public forum folks.  If you tweet something negative OR positive it will be seen and companies (and people) don’t like being dissed in public.  I’ve been known to see a negative tweet, help the person out, and then request that they re-tweet something positive.  Why yes, that does take balls. 

Link everything  If you blog or put something cool out on Facebook, then link to it via Twitter.  Use Twitter as your speakers and amp – your blog as your microphone.

Have people initial  If mulitple folks on your library staff are using the Twitter account, then have them use a two letter inital at the end.  It helps you keep track of who is tweeting what, and builds personality into the Twitter experience.

Speaking of personality If you are tweeting for your library, you might not want to have multiple people tweeting.  Develop and voice and style and stick with it.  Is your Twitter account purely informational?  Funny?  Educational?  People will begin to have a specific expectation of your account so find the voice that fits you and stick with it.  Remember your audience when making the decision as well – what’s funny to you and I may not be funny to Joe Patron.  Don’t piss off the tax payers. 

Don’t be so sensitive.
I recently watched a popular member of the Twitterverse launch an attack against another member of the Twitterverse when the person sent out a link on a sensitive topic.  Person A (the attacker) didn’t feel that Person B (the attacked) didn’t provide enough context for the article and felt that it was a negative and horrible thing to be tweeting.  Turns out Person B was horrified by the content of the article and wanted people to be informed.  Before slamming someone, maybe DM them and say “hey, what did you mean by that” or politely ask publicly what is up.  Hundreds of people ended up slamming person B, following in the footsteps of Person A.  Person B was quite upset and genuinely shocked – and I stopped following Person A.  (Did you catch all that A, B, A, B???)

So, there you go.  Glad I got that off my chest.  Hope I didn’t offend any of you.  If I did, please see my last point.

I’m interested in hearing your Twitter pet peeves.