Category Archives: Books

Get your funny on, people…

Heads up!

Participate in the caption contest sponsored by Awful Library Books for a chance to win “The Passage” by Justin Cronin.

You only have until December 31 so hurry up and get over there!!! Make me proud!

I’m a Nicole Engard groupie

There.  I’ve said it.  I got a copy of “Library Mashups” and I can’t put it down.  Twenty minutes after I had it in my possession, I emailed her telling her I loved the book.  It rocks.

Engard contributes to and edits the work of 25 contributors in this great book that explores the ways libraries deliver data.  By exploring new tools and offering insight into old ones, Engrad and her colleagues really tread on new ground in relation to getting information out to the public.

I was particularly drawn to her information on effectively using Delicious and Youtube in libraries.  She is all about using the software when it is needed and is beneficial – not when it is just some clumsy add on to a website or creates no value at all.  I felt myself developing more concrete ideas about how these technologies are integrated into existing library webpages and for the first time understood why they can be so useful.  Prior to that, I just kind of thought “Oh, and there’s Delicious which is just website tagging that can get really crazy and messy and would be overwhelming to the public at times”.

The idea of externalizing the knowledge that librarians have also really intrigued me.  The concept that we should share what we know with our users so that they too can become effective users while also seeing the true value of librarians and librarianship totally rocked.  It’s like a peep show – we show the public how much we rock and we help them out by sharing what we know, and then they want more and keep coming back.  (I know, I have a dirty mind, but the analogy works…)

I’m still reading and there is so much this book has to offer.  For instance, I can’t wait to read about Yahoo! Pipes and ways that you can improve your OPAC.  Whether you’re a tech novice or a hard-core programmer type  this book will contribute to your knowledge.

Check out Nicole and “Library Mashups” on her website: http://www.web2learning.net/  (It too is a peep show.  Of library stuff.  Not of Nicole.  Dirty blog reading people.  Sheesh.)

Bookseer

Check this out: http://bookseer.com/

A fun resource!  You won’t get any hits if you get the title even a tad wrong or misspell, however.  But that is certainly fair.

Pass it on!

Food for thought…

There has been the most amazing conversation happening at the YALSA general discussion listserv about two of my favorite things – FOOD and BOOKS.  Someone asked for ideas about books with food themes so that teens could come to book club and actually cook the meals made in the books.  I love these and really wanted to share.  It’s a fun idea for any age.

(The post that started the conversation) We are going to try changing our teen book club to a cooking/book club for the summer.  Each time they meet they will cook a recipe related to the book (i.e. Chicken Enchiladas and Twilight).  We are having a hard time coming up with some book/food choices.  Any ideas would be greatly appreciated.

Below are the some of the ideas that were shared – names and libraries excluded:

It might be fun to read one of the survival type books (i.e. How I Live Know, Life as We Knew it, Hunger Games, Hatchet) and make a meal out of some of the types of foods the characters lived on.

You could read The Fold by An Na and make bibimbap (spelling varies) as Joyce does.

Soul Enchilada by Gill
Nothing to Lose by Flinn (some kind of carnival food)
Cupid: A tale of love and desire by Lester (ambrosia)

The first thing that came to mind was actually the Percy Jackson series and for food you could make Ambrosia. I also thought of /13 Little Blue Envelopes/ and making food relevant to the countries she visits. Also, /Al Capone Does My Shirts /and lemon cake.

What about cooking a diner-style breakfast to go along with “The Fortunes of Indigo Skye.”

Maybe you could make something that you think the character would probably eat, based on everything else in the story or the location, even if it is never explicitly stated.  A story taking place in Philadelphia could = Philly cheese steaks, for instance. 

For younger teens, you could do Project Mulberry and have them eat KimChi.

Another good one that combines growing up and food is Hope Was Here by Joan Bauer.

The Kindle is the least of librarians’ problems…

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20090524/ap_on_re_as/as_odd_japan_scary_toilet_paper

The bathroom could become a real threat. 😉

PDF Books

Need books in PDF?  Check out this PDF Book Search Engine: http://search-pdf-books.com/

I did a search for The Sun Also Rises and it came up with a list of PDF versions of the book from different sources.

Solidarity, friends. Solidarity.

It seems contrary to the way in which librarians want to think…but I’m going to say it…

Team up with local booksellers – the small guys with the corner shops.  Have them send traffic to you, send traffic to them.   See if you can buy from them to build your library collection.  Develop events with them. 

Why do I say this?  Because I’ve posted about it in the past around the time of the American Bookseller Association annual conference – trends with booksellers eventually become library trends.  And then I got this:

http://campaign.constantcontact.com/render?v=001sCMoR2JSxKJ-G-riXnB02lajI8q3TcJI8hl-bRzp6lucCu8vxAxmldUQAWGWjxrIeiWaf_jDBtkhpmmfb0m-5meYJbjUITgInVFrCGG6bSwGLQGBp2JCZCzFtBRiFSHWzoHa2MWhtRBjST5GQHW5K9zKPxIng9si

from the Wayne State University listserv.  The Shaman Drum Bookstore is struggling.  It is an institution in Ann Arbor and in Michigan.  The sun will shine, the snow will fall, the Shaman Drum will sell useful, unique, hip and countercultural media.  And the letter is a call for help and sounds very familiar to the ears of librarian.

It’s worth reading…

NYPL excels at “buyer segmentation”

newrulesofmarketingI was just flipping through The New Rules of Marketing and PR: How to use news releases, blogs, podcasting, viral marketing and online media to reach buyers directly by David Meerman Scott  and he features New York Public Library’s website as a sample of a website that excels at reaching multiple buyer segments through their website.  It’s unique in that on the homepage alone, a wide breadth and depth of answers can be found for many types of patrons. 

You know the profession is doing something right when a business book features a library as a great business/marketing model!

January Magazine

Have you heard of January Magazine?  I must admit that until this evening, I had not.  But wow, do I like it!  Book recommendations, reviews, and interviews.  And the format is nice…even if a post (it’s a blog with many talented contributors) is long, it is segmented in such a way that you can read it in useful chunks.

Check out this great link to cookbooks: http://www.januarymagazine.com/cookbook/cookbook.html

Creative Way To Get Magazine Subscriptions For Your Library

I don’t know about you, but I am getting a ton of those cards in the mail for magazines I subscribe to:
Renew your subscription and get another gift subscription for a friend FREE!!! (Domino)
Buy one subscription full price, another at half price, and the third subscription FREE! (Real Simple)
Buy TWO for the price of ONE! (ESPN The Magazine)
I’m sure your patrons are getting these cards too!  Perhaps a campaign is in order: “Give your gift subscription to the library!”  Heck…I love Domino, but I don’t have a friend who would really want the free subscription.  I’m going to ask my area library if they want me to send the free one their way.
Why not?  We ask folks for donations all the time…might as well ask for something they are likely to sign up for and get for free anyways.  Helps you with your subscriptions, helps them score a discount on magazines.  You can’t beat that!